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Faculty Interests Research Description

Esther Angert Esther Angert

Microbiology
My laboratory studies intestinal symbionts. One group of bacteria of particular interest is the Epulopiscium family. Some of these intestinal symbionts of tropical surgeonfish are among the largest known bacteria, with individuals reaching lengths of 0.6 mm. These cells also reproduce in an unusual manner.

Nicolas Buchon Nicolas Buchon

Entomology
We study host microbe interactions (immunology, microbiology), as well as intestinal physiology. We focus on how gut microbes (either invading pathogens or the indigenous gut microbiota) alter stem cell behavior in the gut.

Yung-Fu Chang Yung-Fu Chang

Vet Diagnostic Lab
Molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis; vaccine development; functional genomics.

Joshua S. Chappie Joshua S. Chappie

Molecular Medicine
Our lab utilizes a combination of structural biology, biochemistry, and cell biology to dissect the mechanisms of complex molecular machines.

Matthew DeLisa Matthew DeLisa

Robert F. Smith School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Our lab is interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying protein machinery in the environment of a living cell. We are unique in our ability to probe and exploit the function and specificity of protein machinery by integrating protein engineering with microbial genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology.

Heather Feaga

Microbiology
The lab is focused on how bacteria maintain protein synthesis capacity under stress. We aim to identify factors that interact with the ribosome and prevent stalling, and to understand the impact of ribosome stalling on cell physiology.

Melanie Filiatrault Melanie Filiatrault

SIPS/Section of Plant Pathology & Plant Microbe Biology
Our group studies gene expression in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Specifically we are interested in determining what role small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) play in controlling how the bacteria respond to environmental signals and how these molecules regulate factors important for virulence.

Laura Goodman Laura Goodman

Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
My research is on pathogen discovery and surveillance, with focus areas on tick-borne disease and antimicrobial resistance. My laboratory is embedded in a veterinary diagnostic testing environment and develops novel methods that can be incorporated into animal health diagnostics.

Maria Harrison Maria Harrison

Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research
Molecular, genetic, genomic and cellular analyses of endosymbiotic associations of plants and fungi, exocytosis and membrane trafficking in plant cells, symbiotic phosphate and nitrogen transporters, phosphate sensors and phosphate sensing, hormone signaling in symbiosis, transcriptional regulation of symbiotic gene expression, microbial interac

Anthony Hay Anthony Hay

Microbiology
There are three main foci in my lab. We study the ability of microorganisms to degrade pharmaceuticals and personal care products. We use molecular ecology tools to study microbes in a variety of habitats as diverse as sand dunes and drinking water biofilms. We also study the impact that a defective prophage remnant has on the ability of E.

John Helmann John Helmann

Microbiology
We use Bacillus subtilis as a model system to study bacterial stress responses relevant to host-pathogen interactions. These include cell envelope stress responses (e.g. relevant to those elicited by antibiotics), metal ion homeostasis, and oxidative stress responses.

Tory Hendry Tory Hendry

Microbiology
We study ecology and evolution in host-microbe interactions. Work in the lab focuses on interactions between the bacterium

Ailong Ke Ailong Ke

Molecular Biology and Genetics
CRISPR-Cas as prokaryotic immunity system and as eukaryotic genome editing tool; Riboswitches in prokaryotic gene regulation My laboratory mainly uses biochemistry and structural biology tools to dissect molecular mechanisms in RNA-dominated biological processes. My lab focuses on two central themes in RNA biology.

Fay-Wei Li Fay-Wei Li

Boyce Thompson Institute
The Li lab uses genomic tools to investigate the evolution and biology of seed-free plants: ferns, fern allies, and bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts). We are particularly interested in their symbioses with N2-fixing cyanobacteria, which provide plants with their own source of nitrogen fertilizer.

John C. March John C. March

Biological and Environmental Engineering
By rewiring cellular signaling circuitry, highly specific responses can be tailored to a wide array of process inputs. Most of the work in the March laboratory is centered in three major areas: signal transduction, metabolism, and eukaryotic-prokaryotic interactions.

Greg Martin Greg martin

Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology
The Martin laboratory studies the molecular basis of bacterial infection processes and the plant immune system. The research focuses on speck disease which is caused by the infection of tomato leaves with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

Teresa Pawlowska Teresa Pawlowska

School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology & Plant-Microbe Biology
I am a fungal evolutionary biologist using various fungal-bacterial and fungal-plant associations as models to understand the evolution of symbioses in general. My current work is focused on evolution and ecology of symbiotic associations formed by fungi with bacteria.

Joseph Peters Joseph Peters

Microbiology
Our lab is interested in DNA replication, recombination and repair. We are especially interested in a special type of mobile DNA element called Tn7-like transposons. These elements are found in 10-20% of bacteria. A subgroup of these elements naturally associate with CRISPR-Cas systems allowing programable guide RNA-directed transposition.

Marci Scidmore Marci Scidmore

Vet Microbiology and Immunology
Molecular Mechanisms of Chlamydia pathogenesis with an emphasis on vacuolar biology, vesicular trafficking of the chlamydial vacuole, and host-pathogen interactions.

Christine Smart Christine Smart

School of Integrative Plant Science
My program studies diseases of vegetable crops, focusing on population genetics/genomics, detection, and disease management. Please note that my lab is on the Geneva campus so while some research and meetings can occur in Ithaca, much of the work would be completed in Geneva. Most students work in my lab between semesters or in the summer.

Holger Sondermann Holger Sondermann

Molecular Medicine
We use an interdisciplinary approach to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying fundamental cellular processes in the areas of bacterial signaling and eukaryotic membrane fusion. Research designs incorporate structural biology, biophysics, biochemistry, and cell biology with a particular focus on protein structure-function studies.

Bryan Swingle Bryan Swingle

Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology
We are investigating the molecular basis of plant-bacterial interactions and interactions among bacteria.  We use a variety of techniques that range from basic microbiology to state of the art genomics.  We currently have projects investigating aspects of the following:

Elad Tako Elad Tako

Food Science - USDA
Dietary iron deficiency affects approximately 30% of the world's population. Hence, my research approach utilizes both cellular and animal models to assess mineral bioavailability (including iron and zinc) in standard and biofortified food crops (including maize, beans and lentil).

Stephen Winans Stephen Winans

Microbiology
My lab uses three different pathogenic bacteria to study fundamental aspects of host-detection by pathogenic bacteria, as well as pheromone-mediated communication between bacteria during host colonization.

Joseph B. Yavitt Joseph B. Yavitt

Natural Resources
Ecology and forest and wetland ecosystems