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Faculty Interests Research Description

Eric Alani Eric Alani

Molecular Biology and Genetics
My research efforts are focused on understanding highly conserved mismatch repair (MMR) systems, which recognize and repair base pair and small insertion/deletion mismatches that arise as the result of DNA replication errors, DNA damage, and genetic recombination.

Avery August

Microbiology and Immunology
We are interested in the role of tyrosine kinases, particularly the kinase Itk, in the regulation of the immune response. We work on the role of intracellular signaling in regulating T cell differentiation and cytokine production, particularly inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

Nicolas Buchon Nicolas Buchon

Entomology
We study host microbe interactions (immunology, microbiology), as well as intestinal physiology. We focus on how gut microbes (either invading pathogens or the indigenous gut microbiota) alter stem cell behavior in the gut.

Jonathan Cheetham Jonathan Cheetham

Clinical Sciences
Peripheral nerve repair. Specifically, understanding the relationship between the immune response to nerve injury and recovery and modulating the immune response to improve functional outcome after injury. Restoring laryngeal function in humans, dogs and horses using regenerative medicine techniques combined with reinnervation.

Soon Hon Cheong Soon Hon Cheong

Clinical Sciences
Our lab focuses on Comparative Reproductive Medicine to advance our understanding of reproductive physiology as well as improving our ability to manipulate reproduction for increased fertility or sterility.

Ben Cosgrove Ben Cosgrove

Biomedical Engineering
The Cosgrove laboratory develops and utilizes systems bioengineering approaches to study the signaling network alterations underlying the decline of stem cell function and tissue regeneration in aging and disease.

Susan Daniel Susan Daniel

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Research in the Daniel group focuses on transport and dynamics at biological interfaces and solid surfaces. On the biological side, we are primarily interested in understanding the roles of membrane lipids and protein-lipid interactions on biological function.

Matthew DeLisa Matthew DeLisa

Robert F. Smith School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Our lab is interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying protein machinery in the environment of a living cell. We are unique in our ability to probe and exploit the function and specificity of protein machinery by integrating protein engineering with microbial genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology.

Robert Dick Robert Dick

Molecular Biology and Genetics
Using protein biochemistry, tissue culture, electron microscopy, and structure determination, my research team studies how viruses assemble and spread between cells. By understanding the molecular and macromolecular structures of viruses, we are able to identify drug targets.

Scott D. Emr Scott D. Emr

Molecular Biology and Genetics
Intracellular membrane trafficking fundamentally involves vesicles that bud from various membranes to be transported elsewhere within the endomembrane system of the eukaryotic cell.

Lisa Fortier Lisa Fortier

Vet Clinical Sciences
Comparing Embryonic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair Isolation and Culture of Embryonic Stem Cells for Articular Cartilage Repair Role of Rho Proteins in Chondrocyte Differentiation

Laura Goodman Laura Goodman

Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
My research is on pathogen discovery and surveillance, with focus areas on tick-borne disease and antimicrobial resistance. My laboratory is embedded in a veterinary diagnostic testing environment and develops novel methods that can be incorporated into animal health diagnostics.

Maureen Hanson Maureen Hanson

Molecular Biology and Genetics
Our lab has a diversity of projects in plant biology and biomedical sciences. We study photosynthesis and RNA editing in plants as well as the molecular basis of a disease using white blood cells and plasma from subjects. See both hansonlab.org and neuroimmune.cornell.edu

John Helmann John Helmann

Microbiology
We use Bacillus subtilis as a model system to study bacterial stress responses relevant to host-pathogen interactions. These include cell envelope stress responses (e.g. relevant to those elicited by antibiotics), metal ion homeostasis, and oxidative stress responses.

John Hermanson John Hermanson

Vet Biomedical Sciences
Muscle biology, biomechanics, comparative anatomy, bat biology. Equine neuromuscular biology, bat locomotion (flight and overground).

Fenghua Hu Fenghua Hu

Molecular Biology and Genetics / Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology
Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

Kelly Hume Kelly Hume

Clinical Sciences
My research focuses on understanding how DNA damage response mechanisms influence tumorigenesis and chemosensitivity.

Ailong Ke Ailong Ke

Molecular Biology and Genetics
CRISPR-Cas as prokaryotic immunity system and as eukaryotic genome editing tool; Riboswitches in prokaryotic gene regulation My laboratory mainly uses biochemistry and structural biology tools to dissect molecular mechanisms in RNA-dominated biological processes. My lab focuses on two central themes in RNA biology.

Brian Kirby Brian Kirby

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Specific ongoing projects include: Dielectrophoretic particle manipulation, Microfluidic circulating tumor cell capture, Dielectric characterization of algae biodiesel feedstocks, Electrokinetic properties of microfluidic substrates.

Jan Lammerding Jan Lammerding

Biomedical Engineering
The research in the Lammerding Lab is focused on developing and applying novel experimental techniques to explore the interplay between cellular structure and function, with a particular emphasis on the cell nucleus and the nuclear envelope.

Xingen Lei Xingen Lei

Animal Science
antioxidant enzyme on diabetes, obesity, and fatty liver, biotechnology of hydrolytic enzymes for nutrition and environment, defatted microalgae as new feed and food, enrichment of n-3 fatty acids in eggs and chicken

Cynthia Leifer Cynthia Leifer

Microbiology and Immunology
​The overall theme of our research is to understand how the innate immune system and inflammation are regulated. This is important for human health because although the innate immune system is critical for host defense against pathogens, dysregulation of the system leads to chronic inflammation that underlies many diseases.

David Lin Picture of research faculty

Vet Biomedical Sciences
Development of the mouse olfactory system, genomic and genetic approaches to determine how this process of axon guidance and target selection is accomplished.

Rui Hai Liu Rui Liu

Food Science
Dr. Liu’s research program has focused on diet and cancer, the effects of functional foods/nutraceuticals on chronic disease risks, and bioactive compounds in natural products and herbal remedies for anticancer and antiviral activity.

Sabine Mann Sabine Mann

Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
I am interested in the metabolic and nutritional regulation of the immune response during times of stress in large animals, such as in the transition period of dairy cattle or in the neonatal period.

Angela McCleary-Wheeler

Clinical Sciences
My laboratory studies the role of Hedgehog signaling and epigenetic pathways involved in modulating this signaling pathway in cancer.

Nozomi Nishimura Nozomi Nishimura

Biomedical Engineering
We are part of the Schaffer-Nishimura Lab in Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. How do the vascular, immune, inflammatory systems interact with an organ in diseases?

Alan Nixon Alan Nixon

Vet Clinical Sciences
Joint pathobiology and cartilage resurfacing

Kimberly O'Brien Kimberly O'Brien

Nutritional Sciences
Our main research interests in the laboratory focus on mineral dynamics with an emphasis on pediatric and pregnant populations. We are also undertaking studies in adults to identify the genetic differences in iron absorption. To undertake our research projects many of our studies utilize stable mineral isotopes as tracers.

John Parker John Parker

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