Charles "Chip" Aquadro

Department: 
Molecular Biology and Genetics
Office: 
235 Biotechnology Building
Phone: 
607-254-4838

We study naturally occurring genomic variation in natural populations, focusing on Drosophila populations and species from around the world. We are particularly interested in the evolution of genes that regulate germ line stem cells, differentiation of which leads to eggs and sperm and thus critical to reproduction.  We draw on the tools of molecular and cell biology as well as experimental and theoretical population genetics and comparative genomics to discover  the evolutionary forces acting on individual genes. Population Genetics, Comparative Genomics, Evolution

Research Interests: 
Cell Biology
Computational Biology
Development
Evolution
Genetics
Genomics
Molecular Biology
BioG 2990/4990 Credit: 
Yes
Paid Work Study: 
Yes
Paid Non-Work Study: 
Yes
Volunteer: 
No
Honors Thesis: 
Yes
Research Activities in Which Undergraduates Participate: 
Molecular studies of DNA sequence variation (PCR, sequencing), studies of the functional consequences of naturally occurring variation (phenotypes include reproductive success, fecundity, lifespan, cell biology imaging of germline stem cells, CRISPR-Cas9 editing of key genes involved in germline stem cell regulation to test evolutionary hypotheses). Evaluation of the interaction of Wollbachia intracellular microbes with germline stem cell genes as possible drivers of rapid molecular evolution seen in these genes. There are opportunities for computationally strong students to carry out related population genetic and comparative genomic analyses.
Approximate Number of Students in the Lab per Semester: 
2
Is There a Minimum Number of Hours per Week: 
Yes
If So, How Many?: 
10