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Robert Howarth

Robert Howarth
Department: 
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Office: 
E309 Corson Hall
Phone: 
(607) 255-6175

Work in our lab is diverse, but generally focuses on how human activity affects the chemistry and ecological functioning of the Earth and aquatic ecosystems.  Specific topics include the role of methane in global warming, lifecycle analysis of the environmental consequences (including global warming) of biofuels and shale gas, planning for the energy transformation to a fossil-fuel-free world, modeling the  fluxes of nutrients from large watersheds to coastal oceans, approaches for reducing nutrient pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural systems, and the consequences of nitrogen pollution on seagrass health and the functioning of coastal marine ecosystems.trient pollution. For instance, our work on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes to freshwater and estuarine systems explores fundamental differences on controls on N and P cycles as well as contributes to improved management of coastal eutrophication resulting from such inputs.

Research Interests: 
Climate Change
Ecology
Environmental
Marine Biology
BioG 2990/4990 Credit: 
Yes
Paid Work Study: 
No
Paid Non-Work Study: 
No
Volunteer: 
Yes
Honors Thesis: 
Yes
Research Activities in Which Undergraduates Participate: 
Modeling, data synthesis, lab chemistry and field sampling
Approximate Number of Students in the Lab per Semester: 
1-2
Is There a Minimum Number of Hours per Week: 
Yes
If So, How Many?: 
4